Page 24 of 27 FirstFirst ... 142223242526 ... LastLast
Results 231 to 240 of 268

Thread: The Airplane thread

  1. #231
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/michael...-crash-at-jfk/

    Did An Emirates A380 Almost Crash At JFK?

    DEC 11, 2017 @ 07:59 PM
    Michael Goldstein , CONTRIBUTOR
    I cover the travel biz: airlines, hotels, rental cars and destinations
    Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

    Last week, in what so far has been a little-reported incident, an Airbus A380 operated by Emirates Airlines apparently descended below minimum altitude to about 200 feet on approach to New York’s JFK Airport.

    According to the Aviation Herald, the drama took place on December 4, 2017. The A380-800, flight EK-207 from Dubai, United Arab Emirates, to New York was on final approach to JFK runway 13L.

    The plane was reportedly on the so-called “Canarsie approach” named for a nearby neighborhood in Brooklyn. The A380 was executing a 90 degrees turn onto a very short final approach when it “descended below minimums.” This prompted air traffic controllers to warn the pilots that "you appear to be extremely low on approach” while the aircraft was about halfway into the turn, two and a half miles short of the runway.

    Hearing the warning, the A380 crew called "missed approach" and climbed out. The pilots were guided to another approach, this time to runway 22L. They landed safely about 10 minutes after the go-around. Radar data from the FAA suggests the plane was at 200 feet above ground level (AGL) at its lowest point.

    This is actually the second descent below a safe level for an Emirates A380 in three months. The Emirates A380 was reportedly much too low on approach to Moscow Domodedovo Airport. Flight EK131, carrying 446 passengers and crew, flew below recommended minimum, going as low as 400 feet AGL 8 nautical miles from the runway. The recommended height would have been over 2000 feet.

    The Moscow incident is under investigation by the UAE’s General Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) which is treating the Sept. 10, 2017, episode as a “serious incident." The plane finally landed safely after a second unsuccessful attempt, during which the pilot reportedly told the tower “everything is great.”

    The UAE’s GCAA was already looking into the August 2016 incident where an Emirates Boeing 777 crash-landed at Dubai Airport. The crash, which killed a responding firefighter, was reportedly “due to a go-around gone wrong.”
    Reuters also noted that Russian authorities are investigating a 2016 crash involving UAE airline flydubai in the city of Rostov-on-Don, which killed all 62 on board. A preliminary report suggested pilot error may have been the cause. Chinese authorities also reportedly fined Emirates and banned the airline from adding new destinations in China for six months, after two incidents described as “unsafe operations”.

    Meanwhile, on December 9 of this week, an Airbus A321 operated by Qatar Airways caught fire while undergoing routine maintenance in Doha. The plane reportedly suffered extensive damage. Qatar also operates eight A380 aircraft, out of a total order for ten.

    Back in New York, suburbs bordering JFK specifically mention the A380 in their discussion of airport issues.

    Peter Granickas, a Howard Beach resident and member of a local Community Board, said the big Airbus A380 jets fly lower over residential areas for longer periods, straining to gain altitude. “When a 380 takes off and start to climb, it looks like the train on the hill saying ‘I think I can, I think I can. It’s no wonder they’re talking about cutting down trees in [Idlewild] Park.”

  2. Likes Flaps10, Uwe liked this post
  3. #232
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the...heir-own-23822

    Russia's MiG-25s Flew So Fast They Destroyed Their Own Engines

    Robert Farley
    December 27, 2017

    In contrast with its older cousin, the MiG-21, a very limited number of Foxbats remain in service. Most of these fly in the Algerian Air Force and the Syrian Arab Air Force, although some reports have emerged of a MiG-25 returning to service in Libya. Most Foxbats retired shortly after the end of the Soviet Union, with a few serving for a time in successor state air forces. Iraqi MiG-25s were largely destroyed in the Gulf War, with the survivors eliminated in Operation Desert Storm.

    In the late 1960s, the USSR debuted what appeared to be the world’s deadliest fighter. The MiG-25 (NATO term “Foxbat”) could outrun any fighter in the air, and indeed any military aircraft other than the SR-71 Blackbird.

    Bearing a wicked name, a forbidding profile, and some great stats, the Foxbat looked like a world-beater. Combining exceedingly high speed with high altitude tolerance and a heavy weapons load, it looked as if the plane could contribute effectively on the Central Front while also helping to immunize Soviet airspace from U.S. penetration. Combined with the lessons of third-generation fighters in Vietnam, the existence of the Foxbat helped spur U.S. innovation, pushing the development of the F-15 Eagle.

    But the Foxbat never lived up to its billing. Deficiencies in design, manufacturing problems, and the disappearance of key aspects of its mission meant that it could not seriously compete on quality with the best fighters of the age, or on costs with models such as the MiG-21. Despite its stunning performance, the Foxbat has now nearly disappeared from the inventories of the world’s air forces.

    Foxbat Inception

    The Foxbat sought to answer the Soviet Union’s need to protect its airspace from fast, high-flying U.S. bombers. The most prominent example was the B-58 Hustler, a Mach-2-capable nuclear bomber that entered service in 1960, but on the horizon loomed the B-70 Valkyrie, a futuristic bomber capable of penetrating Soviet airspace at speeds in excess of Mach 3. Armed with long-range missiles, a large radar and powerful engines, the Soviets designed the Foxbat to catch and kill these fast bombers.

    The Foxbat entered service in 1970 (the same year the Hustler left service, and eight years after the cancellation of the B-70), with the last aircraft rolling off the production line in 1984. In all, the Soviet Union produced 1,186 Foxbats for foreign and domestic needs, with the overwhelming majority serving in the USSR. The USSR never licensed the Foxbat for foreign production, and the Chinese never cared enough about the aircraft to make a concerted effort to copy it.

    Of course, the threat posed by Soviet SAM systems would eventually drive U.S. bombers from high altitude to low altitude, reinvigorating the B-52 Stratofortress and transforming the air defense game. Lacking a look down/shoot down radar (the Soviets wouldn’t develop this capability until the 1980s), the MiG-25 would have struggled to carry out its interception role against such tactics. In reality, most of the Foxbat’s Soviet service would come in pursuit of high-flying recon planes, such as the SR-71.

    Capabilities

    The MiG-25s capabilities were, and are, eye-popping. It can make Mach 2.83 in sustained flight, and can go over Mach 3 in bursts if no one cares about the destruction of the engines. In interceptor and air-superiority mode, it carries four R-40 air-to-air missiles, with an outer range limit of fifty miles. It can reach an altitude of over sixty-five thousand feet. Foxbats designed for reconnaissance missions carried sophisticated electronic and photographic equipment, and could reach even higher ceilings. A few Foxbats were optimized for high-speed strike roles.

    These capabilities terrified Western analysts, who lacked good information on how the Foxbat flew in combat situations. The appearance of the MiG-25 (and its ability to set a variety of speed and altitude records) helped drive decisions in the U.S. tactical fighter program, eventually leading to the F-15 Eagle. After a defector landed a new MiG-25 in Japan in 1976, U.S. engineers developed a better sense of the plane’s characteristics.

    What they found was that the Foxbat had troubles. Limitations in Soviet manufacturing techniques made the plane heavier than its Western counterparts. It maneuvered poorly at high speeds, and handled poorly at low altitudes. Its radar was of limited effectiveness in conventional combat situations against enemy fighters, and the handling problems at low altitudes meant that the plane never performed particularly well in that mission. These deficiencies would have been forgivable if the Foxbat had ever conducted its high-altitude interceptor role, but in fact it saw most of its service in far different circumstances.

    Combat

    In combat the Foxbat had limited success. In 1971, a Soviet Foxbat operating out of Egypt turned on its afterburners and managed to escape several Israeli fighters by flying in excess of Mach 3, although the experience permanently burned out the plane’s engines. In the war over Lebanon, Israeli fighters downed several Syrian Foxbats in a series of engagements. During the Syrian Civil War, the desperate Syrian Arab Air Force has pushed aging Foxbats into ground support roles, in one case using air-to-air missiles to attack ground targets.

    Iraq used MiG-25s extensively during the Iran-Iraq War, claiming an uncertain number of Iranian aircraft at equally uncertain cost; the Foxbats reportedly suffered heavily at the hands of Iranian F-14s, while feasting on older aircraft. Iraqi Foxbats claimed both of the last two American aircraft lost in air-to-air combat. In the early days of the Gulf War, a MiG-25 shot down Scott Speicher’s F/A-18 (several other Foxbats were lost to U.S. fighters). In 2002, the USAF set a trap for an Iraqi MiG-25 pilot who had been using the interceptor’s great speed to snipe at U.S. UAVs in the northern no fly zone. Engineers jury rigged an air-to-air missile to a Predator UAV in order to lure the MiG in for a kill. The plan went awry, however, and the MiG destroyed the Predator with an AAM.

    Demise

    In contrast with its older cousin, the MiG-21, a very limited number of Foxbats remain in service. Most of these fly in the Algerian Air Force and the Syrian Arab Air Force, although some reports have emerged of a MiG-25 returning to service in Libya. Most Foxbats retired shortly after the end of the Soviet Union, with a few serving for a time in successor state air forces. Iraqi MiG-25s were largely destroyed in the Gulf War, with the survivors eliminated in Operation Desert Storm.

    In the USSR, the MiG-25 would eventually become the MiG-31 Foxhound, a variant/rebuild that resolved many of the problems with the original, while retaining its key characteristics. The Foxhound does have a look down/shoot down radar, which gives it a fighting chance of tracking and destroying low-flying bombers and cruise missiles.

    Designed to shoot down a bomber that never existed, the bugbear of the MiG-25 helped spur development of one of the finest fighters to ever fly. It would provide a template for the MiG-31, which remains in service today with the Russian Air Force, and which will continue to fly for the foreseeable future. But the few remaining MiG-25s operate in situations unimaginable to their designers, and generally with quite limited effectiveness. Built with a specific mission in mind, the Foxbat never proved flexible enough to adapt to different strategic contexts.

    Robert Farley, a frequent contributor to the National Interest, is author of The Battleship Book. He serves as a senior lecturer at the Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce at the University of Kentucky. His work includes military doctrine, national security and maritime affairs. He blogs at Lawyers, Guns and Money, Information Dissemination and the Diplomat.

  4. #233
    Verified VCDS User
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    456
    Post Thanks / Like

  5. Likes vreihen liked this post
  6. #234
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    For dingle.....

    https://hushkit.net/2015/12/22/the-1...an-aeroplanes/



    “I commissioned this artist to do a dick pic for me, but even he couldn’t capture its graceful might and sleek power, so I donated it to the Louvre. It’s the big triptych in the ‘Viande Et Des Legumes a Deux’ wing.“

  7. Likes Uwe liked this post
  8. #235
    Verified VCDS User NZDubNurd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    883
    Post Thanks / Like
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/100...h-in-northland





    I met with Dean only a week or so prior to the Christmas Break - He helped look after; and shared Piloting of the Rescue Helicopter, I helped look after some of the equipment from out hospital that goes in it. He was a good bloke, shame to see it end like this, but at least he was doing something he loved.

    R.I.P.


  9. #236
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    For those keeping score of unscheduled A380 landings at home:

    Goose Bay, Newfoundland (CYYR): 2
    Newburgh-Stewart, New Yorkistan (KSWF): 1

    About time that Newburgh made the national news for something other than murders.....

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/04/a-si...-blizzard.html

    World's biggest passenger jet forced to land at small New York airport thanks to blizzard

    * Singapore Airlines Flight 26 from Frankfurt, Germany, was bound for JFK.

    * The winter storm has diverted dozens of flights.

    * The passengers are disembarking at Stewart, and the airline said it is working to provide ground transportation for them.

    Leslie Josephs | @lesliejosephs
    Published 20 Hours Ago Updated 4 Hours Ago
    CNBC.com

    A massive winter storm forced an Airbus A380, the world's largest passenger jet, to divert to a small New York airport around 1 p.m. ET on Thursday after heavy winds and whiteout conditions closed runways at its intended destination: John F. Kennedy International Airport.

    The 325 passengers aboard Singapore Airlines Flight 26 from Frankfurt, Germany, found themselves on a snowy runway for more than three hours at humble Stewart International, about 80 miles north of JFK.

    Passengers were leaving the plane after 5 p.m. ET using outdoor stairs, according to Manoel Gerlach, a passenger aboard the plane who was traveling with his wife and toddler son.

    The sight of the giant plane, whose 262-foot wingspan is more than double that of a Boeing 737, was unusual for the airport, which is dwarfed by JFK in terms of passenger traffic. In 2016, about 137,000 passengers boarded at Stewart. At JFK, some 29 million passengers boarded, according to the Department of Transportation.

    The airport's 11,800 foot runway can easily accommodate the large plane, and the airport even bills itself as an "efficient diversion airport" because the runway is so long. But the airport's gates aren't high enough to reach the plane's doors. Stairs were brought to the aircraft and passengers exited the plane into the outdoors, Gerlach said.

    Singapore Airlines was working to arrange ground transportation to New York for the passengers, a spokesman said.

    The flight was one of dozens that were diverted as powerful winds and heavy snow closed runways at some of the busiest airports along the East Coast, including several international long-haul flights.

    Plane-tracking site FlightAware said there were at least 96 diversions due to the storm. More than 3,600 flights were canceled, and airlines have canceled hundreds more on Friday.

    Then the plane, which is used on some of the longest international routes, will fly a very short route: from Stewart to JFK, according The spokesman for Singapore Airlines said it wasn't clear how long that would take, but business-jet operators estimate the flight time on a small jet at about 30 minutes. The plane is expected to then fly back to Frankfurt.

    Stewart's history stretches back to the 1930s when the U.S. Military Academy at West Point built an airfield there to train cadets. It became Stewart Air Force Base in 1948 and what is now the Stewart Air National Guard Base is next to the commercial airport.

    In January 1981, 52 Americans who had been held hostage in Iran returned back to the U.S., landing at Stewart aboard an Air Force VC-137, a variation of a Boeing 707 jet.

    The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has operated the airport for just over a decade, and is trying to attract more airlines to Stewart.
    Last edited by vreihen; 01-05-2018 at 01:36 PM.

  10. #237
    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    19,590
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1
    Wait... Singapore Airlines from FRA to JFK? What's up with that?
    The engineering problems are likely insurmountable. It would be like proposing to land a rocket booster section on a barge floating in the middle of the ocean.

  11. #238
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Uwe View Post
    Wait... Singapore Airlines from FRA to JFK? What's up with that?
    Open-jaw from Singapore? Common route for foreign airlines to pass through FRA on their way to the USA, and apparently exempt from our restrictive rules favoring domestic carriers. Don't most Emirates flights pass through LHR? For that matter, Norwegian Air is flying from UK/Manchester to NY/Stewart regularly now...with 737's! I know that Icelandic Air offers service to mainland Europe from JFK, although they pass through Iceland so it really isn't a good example since they are Iceland's domestic carrier.

    You would be surprised how many flights my ADS-B receiver is logging passing by here from FRA to ATL and DC/Dulles.....

  12. #239
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Air India 787 flying over hoser-land right now, en route from London to Newark:


  13. Likes Boki Ar liked this post
  14. #240
    VCDS Distributor Boki Ar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Arandjelovac, Serbia
    Posts
    917
    Post Thanks / Like

    Arrow

    Point is "Full Throttle" or ?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •