Page 20 of 33 FirstFirst ... 10181920212230 ... LastLast
Results 191 to 200 of 323

Thread: The Airplane thread

  1. #191
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    http://www.popularmechanics.com/mili...9x-sidewinder/

    How Did a 30-Year-Old Jet Dodge the Pentagon's Latest Missile?
    The AIM-9X Sidewinder failed to bring down an aging attack jet.

    By Kyle Mizokami
    Jun 26, 2017

    By now you've probably heard that a U.S. fighter shot down a Syrian jet about a week ago. What you might not know is that before the F/A-18E hit its target, it missed–and it missed with the best, newest U.S. missile.

    On June 18, just moments after a Syrian Arab Air Force Su-22 attacked Coalition forces, a U.S. Navy F/A-18E Super Hornet strike fighter rolled into a firing position and opened fire. The Super Hornet locked onto the Su-22 "Fitter" and launched the Military's most advanced short-range air-to-air missile, which promptly missed. While the plane was eventually brought down by another, different missile, the question remains: why did the AIM-9X Sidewinder miss?

    The Sukhoi Su-22 is a Cold War-era attack jet designed to strike targets on the ground. A single-seat aircraft, like many aircraft designed in the 1970s it had "swing wings." Cutting edge for its time, this feature allowed the plane to maximize its combat range. Known as "Fitter" to NATO, the Su-22 was designed solely as an air-to-ground aircraft with little to no air-to-air capability. It was produced in large numbers and widely sold abroad. The design is obsolete, and while many air forces still fly the Fitter, it isn't by choice. Here's a video of Su-22 Fitters in Polish Air Force service: [omitted]

    The Super Hornet, meanwhile, is the U.S. Navy's top-of-the-line strike fighter. The Super Hornet is armed with both the infrared guided AIM-9X Sidewinder short range air-to-air missile and the radar-guided AIM-120 AMRAAM medium-range missile. It's a potent combination of air-to-air missiles, representing the best of American military technology.

    According to CNN, the Navy Super Hornet locked onto the Su-22 Fitter at a range of 1.5 miles. The Super Hornet launched an AIM-9X, and the Syrian pilot loosed flares to lure the infrared guided missile away from his fighter. The trick worked, and the American missile missed. The Super Hornet then launched an AMRAAM missile which, using radar guidance, is unaffected by flares. This time the Fitter went down.

    So why did the AIM-9X miss? A contributor to Combat Aircraft magazine proposed a plausible theory: While the 9X is designed to resist the allure of defensive flares, but it may have been too specialized in rejecting American flares. Contributor Angad Singh tweeted a story originally written by aviation authority Bill Sweetman about American tests of Soviet aircraft during the Cold War.

    During the 1980s, U.S. Air Force maintained the top secret 4477th Test & Evaluation Squadron. Flying the Tonopah Test Range in Nevada, the 4477th operated Soviet fighters collected from around the world, often captured by allies, to determine their capabilities. According to the story, the Air Force received a flare dispenser that had been on a Su-25 ground attack jet shot down over Afghanistan. The dispenser was quickly attached to a MiG-21 operated by the 4477th and taken out for testing against the latest American infra-red guided missile, the AIM-9P.

    What happened next surprised the Air Force. The AIM-9P Sidewinder, designed to see past flares, was readily diverted by the Soviet flares. The problem was that the -9P was too attuned to the characteristics of American flares it had been tested against and not against the Soviet flares, which according to the squadron commander between 1985 and 1987 were "dirty, and none of them looked the same."

    Did something like this happen in the skies over Syria? The AIM-9X, a relatively new missile, should have easily taken down the aging Su-22 Fitter. A lot of air forces, particularly America's NATO allies, rely on the AIM-9X as their short-range missile. The news that it was unable to shoot down a 30-year-old fighter jet will be disturbing to many.

  2. Likes PetrolDave, Uwe liked this post
  3. #192
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like


    https://uk.news.yahoo.com/woman-thro...205237945.html

    Woman Throws Coins Into Plane Engine 'For Good Luck,' Delaying Flight for Five Hours

    Harriet Sinclair
    Newsweek
    27 June 2017

    An elderly woman delayed a flight in China for more than four hours Tuesday after throwing coins into the plane’s jet engine “for good luck.”

    The 80-year-old threw nine coins into the engine’s turbine and performed a blessing as she was boarding the China Southern Airlines flight at Pudong Airport, prompting passengers to alert airline staff.

    The flight, which was scheduled to leave Pudong for Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport at 12:40 p.m. was delayed until 4:50 p.m. while staff carried out a thorough assessment of the engine turbines.

    Passengers who had already boarded the flight were removed from the aircraft while the search for the coins was being carried out.

    Flight @flightorg


    China Southern Flight 380 was delayed at Shanghai Pudong Int'l Airport on Tues after an elderly woman threw coins into the engine for luck..
    10:28 AM - 27 Jun 2017
    345 345 Retweets 195 195 likes
    Mechanics carrying out the inspection found one coin inside the engine, and eight around it, with the coins having total value of 1.7 yuan (US$0.2), Shanghai Daily reported.

    Police told the newspaper the woman was a practicing Buddhist and had no mental health problems or criminal record, while witnesses on social media claimed the woman had performed the coin-tossing ritual to “wish for a safe flight.”

    "A senior passenger threw coins to the plane's engine and delayed the flight. The passenger involved has been taken away by police," China Southern Airlines said in a statement seen by Circa. "In order to make sure the flight is safe, China Southern maintenance has conducted a full exam of the plane's engine."

    It is not yet clear whether the airline will be taking any further action against the woman, but an investigation into the incident is still underway, The Independent reported.

    Once the airline staff had found all of the coins, passengers were allowed to re-enter the aircraft, and the flight finally got underway more than four hours after boarding had begun. The elderly woman who threw the coins into the engine was not on the flight.

  4. #193
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Holy crap! We just had an F-18 buzz our office! The Blue Angels must be practicing for this weekend's air show at SWF.....

  5. #194
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Speaking of the KSWF air show, are you going again this year Jack? Don't forget your umbrella...and sufficient bail money!!!!!

  6. #195
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    My whiplash from looking out the window whenever one of the Blue Angels flies past for their air show practice brings one thing to mind:



    Negative Ghostrider, the pattern is full.....

  7. #196
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like


    https://www.yahoo.com/style/plane-ne...113113976.html

    Plane nearly ran out of fuel after pilots forgot to bring up landing gear

    Hugh Morris
    The Telegraph
    July 28, 2017

    Two pilots have been suspended from duty after their aircraft, carrying 99 passengers, nearly ran out of fuel because they forgot to retract the landing gear after take-off.

    Air India Flight AI676 was en route to Mumbai from Kolkata on July 22 but was forced to divert to Nagpur when the crew became alarmed by the speed at which the aircraft was losing fuel thanks to the additional drag created by the extended wheels.

    An unidentified source told the Times of India that the “brand new Airbus A320”, one of the most fuel efficient aircraft in existence, had struggled to climb after take-off, prompting the pilots to settle on an altitude of 24,000 feet as opposed to a usual cruising height of 35,000 feet. The source, who made a point of saying that both pilots were women, said it flew like this at 230 knots - as opposed to around 500 knots - for about an hour-and-a-half, while the extended landing gear dragged heavily on the aircraft.

    At this point, 90 minutes into a two-and-a-half-hour flight, the crew requested permission to divert to Nagpur as their fuel would have run out before reaching Mumbai.

    “When preparing to land, they decided to lower the landing gear. At this point they realised that the wheels had been out all the while from Kolkata,” said the source.

    A playback of the flight from FlightRadar24.com shows it failing to reach an altitude higher than 24,000 feet but put the aircraft’s speed at just over 300 knots.

    A spokesperson for Air India told the Times of India the pilots have been “de-rostered” and the airline is investigating.

    The problem is more often experienced in reverse when pilots have difficulty lowering the landing gear during an approach. Such landings are called “belly landings” as aircraft attempt to negotiate a touchdown without wheels. This has been known to occur because crew simply forget to lower the gear. One such incident happened to a light aircraft in 2015 when a pilot, distracted by a moose on the runway in Alaska, forgot to lower the landing gear, meaning his twin-engine Piper PA 31-350 landed on its belly, skidding across the tarmac.

    The report from the National Transportation Safety Board read: “While on final approach, an airplane that landed in front of him reported a moose in the vicinity of the runway. An airport maintenance person announced on the common traffic advisory frequency that he was attempting to chase the moose off of the runway. The pilot became distracted trying to avoid wake turbulence from the preceding airplane and monitor the location of the vehicle and moose and failed to extend the landing gear prior to landing.”

    A remarkable video from 2011 shows a LOT Polish Airlines Boeing 767 landing at Warsaw Chopin Airport without its landing gear, grinding to a halt on the runway on only its fuselage. There were no injuries.


  8. Likes Uwe liked this post
  9. #197
    Ross-Tech Employee Eric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lansdale, PA, USA
    Posts
    2,748
    Post Thanks / Like

    Flightradar24‏Verified account @flightradar24 23h23 hours ago
    When you have to test your new @RollsRoyce engine for 17 hours, you might as well have a bit of fun.
    You ain't metal till you got a clutch pedal

  10. Likes Uwe, vreihen, PetrolDave, NZDubNurd, D-Dub, aTOMic liked this post
  11. #198
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Are the wing struts on a Cessna 152 notoriously weak during hard landings, or was this damage caused by colliding with someone/something after touching down?????



    https://uk.news.yahoo.com/flying-ins...090648039.html

  12. Likes Uwe, Jack@European_Parts, Boki Ar liked this post
  13. #199
    Verified VCDS User
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    509
    Post Thanks / Like
    Probably cart wheeled on the beach. You can see the prop is bent, and the nose wheel strut is tilting quite far forward (indicating firewall damage).

    I've never heard of someone folding up a C152 strut, and I've put some effort into it.

    Some problems with the sniff test here. Student and "highly skilled instructor", hits some people on the beach and claims he had no choice. Yet also mentions engine trouble and a Mayday.

    Aviate, Navigate, Communicate.

    Aviate: You fly the biggest chunk to the ground
    Navigate: Assuming the airplane is under control, point it where it is best going to serve you
    Communicate: Got all the above in order? Now you can key the mic.

    With a crowded beach I would just put it in shallow water - which is getting popular this month

  14. #200
    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    23,483
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1
    Fascinating:



    Today, I think some cameras would be a better solution to letting the pilot see the runway at the extreme angle of attack it requires to have a semi-reasonable landing speed:

    The engineering problems are likely insurmountable. It would be like proposing to land a rocket booster section on a barge floating in the middle of the ocean.

  15. Likes vreihen, Boki Ar, PetrolDave, Flaps10, Eric liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •