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Thread: Touareg

  1. #1
    New User hmh01's Avatar
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    Touareg

    Hi.

    New member all the way from Denmark. I have been the Lucky owner of a VW Touareg V10 2005 for a year now. Just before Christmas i got this banging sound from under the car, just under the gear shift stick. Went under it and found the holding bearings of the Axel had given up. I ordered a new one, 250 DKR , changed it, even though it wasent easy getting the old one off. Put it all back together and went for a test drive, my good, it sounded even worse. My question is now: does the hardy disc need to be fitted in excact same location as before or am i missing something? the repair seemed pretty straight forward and easy at first. Does anybody have a good advice i would be glad to hear it.

    take care out there and drive safely

    regards

    Michael

  2. #2
    Verified VCDS User PetrolDave's Avatar
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    Doesn't sound VCDS related to me, purely mechanical... maybe in the wrong forum?

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    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
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    Moving to General VW/Audi repair.

    Some pictures might be helpful here too, because the terminology use by the OP is quite confusing. I suspect he's conflating "axle" with driveshaft, and I have no clue what a "hardy disc" is.

    -Uwe-
    The engineering problems are likely insurmountable. It would be like proposing to land a rocket booster section on a barge floating in the middle of the ocean.

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  6. #4
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    Google gave me a clue on that "hardy disc"

    Hardy disc:: A disc-style flexible coupling.


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  8. #5
    NostraJackAss Jack@European_Parts's Avatar
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    Most commonly refired to as "flex disk" or "giubo"
    Sometimes also an anti vibration or resonance muffler or shaft dampener.

    Disks should always be marked for direction of rotation and direction faced.

    Did you check the mounts if the rear of trans, main shaft carrier bearing and bushing/mount at rear differential?
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  9. #6
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    The center CV joint itself frequently binds up and causes vibration. The bearing itself can also fail and create extra resistance.

    Replacing the bearing requires removing the center CV joint's boot, which may require cutting it and replacing it during reassembly. Mark the relationship between the two halves of the axle before separating, then also have to pry open the clip that holds the CV joint to the splines on the front shaft and separate the two halves of the shaft. Use a puller to remove the press fit bearing, press new bearing on, install new boot, put some grease in the CV joint, then reinstall, noting of course the correct orientation of the two halves of the shaft that you marked previously, then have to hammer the new boot into place to sort of crimp it to the CV joint.

    Do all that, and you'll probably still have a vibration anyway because the center CV joint is likely binding and causing the entire problem.

    This is why most shops after going through all that once just recommend replacing the whole shaft in the future. Far less time invested for them and assured results that the problem will be fixed the first time.

    I replaced the bearing and boot on mine only to have it tear the support bushing up shortly because it was still vibrating. I split it all apart again and disassembled the CV joint numerous times and re-arranged the order of the balls and orientation of the cage until I got them to a point where it felt like the joint was moving completely freely without binding. Reapplied grease and reassembled, did a half-ass fix of the bushing and put it all back together. So far so good.

    But in the future, it's just getting a whole new axle. It's a giant pain of a job and there's no guarantee it will be right because often times the CV joint itself is the issue, not the support bearing bushing or the bearing itself. The support bushing is often just a casualty of the center CV joint binding and creating massive vibrations.

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