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Thread: Team Atlas

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    FoRT jyoung8607's Avatar
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    Team Atlas

    So I go on the Interwebs tonight to see what sort of interesting tweaks might be available on the Atlas, now that it's been out for almost two months. Some intrepid soul will have plotted out all the cool nerd-knobs already, right?



    Quantity two (2) threads on the entire Interweb with Atlas scans. Both from the same Atlas. My Atlas. I guess I get to do some trailblazing here.

    Another fun fact: test-drove an Atlas on 5/19, bought our Atlas on 6/3, didn't try to add to insurance until 6/18 or thereabout. It was still the first Atlas that Allstate/Esurance had been asked to insure, nationwide. They had to open an internal case for us and call VW and get a bunch of info and load the VINs in their system first.

    Are these things not being produced in serious volume yet or something? I thought I was getting away from snowflake vehicles.
    Last edited by jyoung8607; 07-07-2017 at 12:27 AM.

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    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    Still the second-coolest (*) mom at soccer practice?????

    (*) The coolest mom is driving the Porsche-badged SUV.

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    Verified VCDS User Keithuk's Avatar
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    Yes this has been talked about on the thread you made jyoung8607 as Goggle shows 2018 Atlas, 3.6 FSI VR6 (CDVC)
    New User Keith

    2010 Golf GTD (170) CBBB, 5 Door, Shadow Blue (P6/D5Q), Flat Tyre Indicator, Basic Protection Pack + VCDS.

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    FoRT jyoung8607's Avatar
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    Interesting head-to-head of a Nissan Pathfinder vs. a VW Atlas. The most interesting part is where the Nissan flat refuses to go up a small hill (jump to 7:05). No wheel-spin, just plain torque limit or TQ stall or something. Pretty crazy. The reviewer blames it on the CVT. I'm not sure how Nissan CVTs work, belt or chain, whether it allows slip internally without serious trauma.



    Double decker Euro Passat represent! Believe it or not, this combination mostly works.

    Last edited by jyoung8607; 07-24-2017 at 06:07 PM.

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    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    I would hope that any large SUV could tow a ~2,400 pound (empty) trailer with a couple of tents in it! The bigger question is if there a factory trailer brake controller and 7-pin socket on the rear bumper?????

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    FoRT jyoung8607's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vreihen View Post
    I would hope that any large SUV could tow a ~2,400 pound (empty) trailer with a couple of tents in it! The bigger question is if there a factory trailer brake controller and 7-pin socket on the rear bumper?????
    Oh, there's more than a couple tents in it. In fact, this one is loaded far too front-heavy, even our dads with Suburbans or F150s don't care for the way it pulls. We've been meaning to fix that one of these days, but it's going to take more doing than you would think. Historically I've pulled our Troop's other trailer with our old GMC Acadia, which is about the same size and capacity but internally arranged in a much more tow vehicle-friendly way.

    By the book, the Atlas isn't allowed to pull either of them. If ordered with trailer prep, the manual allows up to 5,000lbs of trailer weight (both are okay) and 500lbs on the tongue (our easy trailer is okay) but the manual specifically prohibits use of more than a 2" ball, and both of them require a 2 5/16" ball. Don't know what that's about, not going to worry about it.

    When ordered with trailer prep, it comes pre-wired for a 7-pin socket and an EBC. I guess VW really likes keeping these things worldwide-legit, so they make you install a little NAR 7-pin RV style adapter yourself. Touaregs are allegedly set up the same way. And, I transferred my Tekonsha Prodigy P3 over from the Acadia and it works great. EBC pre-wiring was actually a major contingency I asked our dealer salesguy to track down and verify before money changed hands. Believe me, I don't even like taking our little pop-up camper out without the EBC, there was no way in hell I was touching the Scout trailer without it.

    Jason








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    Similar to the way the Touareg/Cayenne is set up. Excepting of course the 7,000 trailer weight.

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    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flaps10 View Post
    Similar to the way the Touareg/Cayenne is set up. Excepting of course the 7,000 7700 trailer weight.
    Fixed that for you.

    -Uwe-
    The engineering problems are likely insurmountable. It would be like proposing to land a rocket booster section on a barge floating in the middle of the ocean.

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    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jyoung8607 View Post
    And, I transferred my Tekonsha Prodigy P3 over from the Acadia and it works great.
    Personally, I'd dump that single-axis-accelerometer POS before ever hitching up another trailer! The Tekonsha P2 is a real tri-axis (read: self-leveling) brake controller, and performs much more consistently/repeatably doing silly things like stopping your trailer. What good are 8-color LCD backlights and readouts of battery voltage and the surface temperature on Mars when you run into a tree because the P3 thought that you were driving up a hill and decided to go light on the brakes?

    I bought into the P3 online forums hype without doing my homework, and the most scary feeling is towing a large trailer through New York City or on the Lawn Guyland Expressway in Sunday beach traffic when you don't know if you'll be getting Jeckyl or Hyde each time that you need to make a brisk stop. If I had to buy another accelerometer-based brake controller, it would be the Hayes G2 or the Tekonsha P2. The worst thing is that I cannot even sell my P3 with a clean conscience, so I leave it in the center console of The Mighty Dodge in case my current brake controller fails or I need a wheel chock in a hurry.

    FWIW, my current brake controller is a Tuson DirecLink. It plugs into both the factory trailer brake controller socket and the OBD port, and magically makes the trailer stop without fanfare or drama based on data that it receives off of the bus. They claim 2008+ VW compatibility, but I doubt that it has been tested against double-decker Passats. I'd personally rather have a hydraulic-based sensor, but the big manufacturer of those for Mighty Dodges went out of business.....

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    FoRT jyoung8607's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vreihen View Post
    Personally, I'd dump that single-axis-accelerometer POS before ever hitching up another trailer! The Tekonsha P2 is a real tri-axis (read: self-leveling) brake controller, and performs much more consistently/repeatably doing silly things like stopping your trailer. What good are 8-color LCD backlights and readouts of battery voltage and the surface temperature on Mars when you run into a tree because the P3 thought that you were driving up a hill and decided to go light on the brakes?
    More knobs more menus more better. It is known.

    In all seriousness, it's never let me down. I have, shall we say, some formative kinetic experiences from my early youth that give me paranoia about stopping distance, particularly in inclement weather. When driving my Phaeton I will absolutely uncork it on lightly trafficked highways but I never, ever, ever tailgate. That goes double for trailering. And when trailering, the combination gets preflighted for fluids and pressures, a walkaround for lighting and signals, a manual blip or two of the EBC at slow speed to make sure it's operating, and I've worked out the ideal boost setting for each of the trailers I regularly use. I know when it's working and I know when it's not, and it works.

    Do be aware, if you're not already, that the P3 can be installed at any reasonable pitch tilt but cannot be angled in yaw or roll, and like any inertial controller, should have a fixed mount and not move around after it's calibrated itself at startup. To give you an example: a couple months ago I swapped vehicles with our Scoutmaster; I borrowed his F150 to pull the above-pictured trailer to summer camp. That picture above was from my test pull around the block to see if I could do it, and the Atlas had a bad case of ass-on-the-ground-itis before we'd even loaded Scouts and personal gear. He had a Tekonsha Primus (another inertial controller) un-mounted, laying sideways in his ashtray. It was super useful. And by useful, I mean it did exactly bupkis without me manually actuating it when slowing down.

    Jason

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