E-golf de-energized

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Nigevw

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Hi i have a accident damaged e-golf that needs welding I've been told it need be de-energized. This is done by the dealer diag so can this be done with a vcds lead ?

Thanks Nige
 
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Uwe

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I have yet to lay hands on an actual e-Golf, but if it's like the hybrids of that vintage, the scan tool doesn't do the de-energizing or re-energizing, it's just used to do a whole lot of CYA verification. What actually de-energizes it is pulling a plug in on 12V circuit that controls the coil in the HV battery's contactor.

It's possible @Dana might know more; she has access to an e-Golf.

-Uwe-
 
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Dana

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@Uwe I hadn't looked into that yet ... however after skimming over the repair manual the e-Golf "De-Energizing the High-Voltage System" section appears to be similar, if not identical, to hybrids of this vintage as you suspected. The repair manual lists several overpriced special tools which are primarily signs, locks and a High-Voltage Cordon but there was an actual high voltage testing module tossed into the mix:

Test Adapter - Hybrid Module - VAS6558A-
https://vw.snapon.com/SpecialToolsDetail.aspx?itemid=39290198
Warning Sign - High-Voltage - VAS6649-
Warning Sign - "Do Not Switch" - VAS6650A-
Warning Sign - "Do Not Insert" - VAS6871-
Service Disconnect Lock - T40262-
-T40262/1-
Connector Test Set - Crocodile Clips - VAG1594/14A-
High-Voltage Cordon - VAS6884-
Supers a few times https://vw.snapon.com/SpecialToolsDetail.aspx?itemId=71200196

After all of the warnings it simply says "De-energize the high-voltage system. Refer to Vehicle Diagnostic Tester". This sounds identical to the process on Andy's 2018 A3 e-tron. For this reason I headed out to the 2017 e-Golf and it appears to have the same type of under-hood high voltage system Maintenance Connector TW that we saw on the A3 years ago. This album contains a few pics of the (filthy) motor bay:


In conclusion I believe you would start an ODIS test plan at which point it would make you print 50 pages of legal disclaimers before giving you further instruction. Although this is purely speculation I suspect it would simply tell you to then to disconnect the Maintenance Connector with the 12V system on/energized.

If you were going to replace HV components I'm reasonably confident that the additional ODIS test plan(s) would assist providing you some guided functions using that HV test module so that a technician could verify the HV system is actually de-energized.​

@Nigevw If you aren't comfortable please reach out to see if you can bounce this off of a current VW/Audi tech that has HV training and experience in your area and/or see if there are any mobile repair technicians in your area that own ODIS, have HV experience and come to your workshop.

Stay Safe,
Dana
 
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duncanlowe

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Please don't take this the wrong way. Shutting down and starting up the HV system is complex. Yes to shut it down might be physically simple, but getting it wrong can result in instant death. Yes, the HV system, if there's a fault, will kill you. Stone dead, instantly.

So the official process includes switching off the power, putting a test adaptor in circuit, switching the power back on. Checking you can see that the power is on, switching off the power again and that you can see that it's off, and checking your test meter is still working OK so it didn't fool you into thinking it was off. Switching back on means checking isolation between the vehicle body and the HV system, and the bonding of the various modules to the vehicle body to ensure you can't get bits that you can touch that are at a high voltage and kill you.

So, there's a reason for all of the equipment, processes and so on. If everything is working, the HV system is very safe. But if something has gone wrong, for example the welding has caused damaged to the insulation on the orange cables, or the equipotential bonding on one of the HV units, how would you know, if you don't follow the processes?
 
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