2006 Audi A6 C6 ABS Fault 01435

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davisev5225

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...........................:facepalm:
Once again, you're not being helpful. Using the start button means I am bypassing the ignition switch (which is attached to the ignition cylinder) and going directly to the ignition relay, by way of the KESSY system.

But hey, let's go over some facts, some of which I might not have posted. (Anything here that I have previously failed to post, I apologize for not providing additional context.) This brake pressure issue often shows up at the start of a drive, but appears to have nothing to do with a cold start, as it can occur on return trips after the engine is already warmed up. It occasionally appears after driving for some time - my commute is between 1 and 2 hours each way, and I've had it show up 10 before I arrive at my destination, though typically, it shows up within the first 20-30 minutes of driving. I've also had it show up more than once in a single driving session, though that has been rare.

If you know how the ignition switch, which I do not engage at any time, is somehow responsible for that, please do share rather than grandstanding with emojis.
 
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davisev5225

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Update: I have swapped my alternator for a new (not remanufactured) one. My engine crank times have dropped from ~2-4 seconds to ~0.5 seconds, and I'm hoping I will no longer see the "no communication with generator" error that I would sometimes get.

Now to see if it was an electrical issue tripping up my ABS controller, and if the new alternator has resolved that issue.
 
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Jack@European_Parts

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That's new information no?
So was DFM kicking in and making alternator field during cranking to brake the starter?
And ignition switch means terminals to operate whether virtual via BCM, Kessy/Traditional lock cylinder type.
I wonder if new alternator has different exciter type regulation?
I have been seeing later LIN charging systems in cars have a brake issue like aforementioned and it not report a problem in any controllers initially during a full fielded crank time!
Usually I just temporarily remove the belt to see.

Sorry I come across the way I write its just I too get annoyed when things mentioned are just dismissed, rather than asking why.

If a controller is unaware of a cranking or switch condition sometimes the virtual or cylinder type terminal 50 than it let's the stupid DFM carry ON!
 
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davisev5225

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Every time I try to reply on mobile, the forums always eat my reply. I don't know why I'm still trying it...



That's new information no?
So was DFM kicking in and making alternator field during cranking to brake the starter?
And ignition switch means terminals to operate whether virtual via BCM, Kessy/Traditional lock cylinder type.
I wonder if new alternator has different exciter type regulation?
I have been seeing later LIN charging systems in cars have a brake issue like aforementioned and it not report a problem in any controllers initially during a full fielded crank time!
Usually I just temporarily remove the belt to see.

Sorry I come across the way I write its just I too get annoyed when things mentioned are just dismissed, rather than asking why.

If a controller is unaware of a cranking or switch condition sometimes the virtual or cylinder type terminal 50 than it let's the stupid DFM carry ON!
OK, if you're talking about the entire ignition system, that's a different story. I'm still not sure how it could apply, though, as I can drive 30 minutes continuously before the error comes up, but I'm always open to ideas.

The alternator didn't fix my brakes issue, though it still needed to be changed. 190k miles on the original alternator is quite a bit. The original alternator with the Audi logo has a Valeo sticker on it, and my new alternator is also a Valeo. I don't claim to know a whole lot about electric fields, but I do wonder if there would be any particularly good reason for the core design to change? I would think they would keep it the same?

Now for the question I tried asking earlier (that the forums ate): is a 4F0 614 517 AA compatible and/or retrofitable to my car? It's at a junkyard on a 2008 A6 Avant 3.2L Quattro, VIN WAUKH74F78N027572. If I can use it, do I just match the coding to my existing module, or do I need different coding because it's technically a different part number?
 
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Jack@European_Parts

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Vehicle Identification No. WAUKH74F86N124065
Model audi a6 av. qu. 3.2
A6
Date of production 15.12.2005
Model year 2006
Sales type 4F55NL
Engine Code BKH
Transmission Code HYR

PART NUMBER

4F0 614 517 Q / L / N
4F0 614 517 P
4F0 910 517 P
 
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davisev5225

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PART NUMBER

4F0 614 517 Q / L / N
4F0 614 517 P
4F0 910 517 P
Thank you.

EDIT: Interestingly enough, I just stumbled across this thread while Googling around:
https://forums.ross-tech.com/showthread.php?17474-A6-C6-3-0-TDi-ABS-problem

I know we don't support piracy here, so I'm not asking anyone to provide support in that thread, but I am curious if this particular swap is possible? It's rather hard to come by junkyard A6's around here, and even harder to find them in Quattro, so if it is theoretically possible to use the AA module, I would be interested in knowing what's involved.
 
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MartinsX

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I'm sorry, but WTF are You doing here on 10 pages instead of replacing an ABS/ESP unit? This is well known fault of Bosch ESP 8.0, mainly electronics fail, very rare, but sensor itself may fail, too. As You have already replaced hydraulic part (with sensor), now just replace the electronic part. 4F0614517L is replaced with 4F0614517N, according ETKA or PL24 = both partnumbers are compatible. And yes, those partnumbers came only with quattro versions.
 
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davisev5225

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I'm sorry, but WTF are You doing here on 10 pages instead of replacing an ABS/ESP unit? This is well known fault of Bosch ESP 8.0, mainly electronics fail, very rare, but sensor itself may fail, too. As You have already replaced hydraulic part (with sensor), now just replace the electronic part. 4F0614517L is replaced with 4F0614517N, according ETKA or PL24 = both partnumbers are compatible. And yes, those partnumbers came only with quattro versions.
I'm 10 pages in because I cannot afford to just drop $2-3k on an ABS controller. I've been exhausting all other possible options (and fixing/replacing other things along the way that needed to be fixed/replaced anyway...) before I commit to a new ABS controller. That represents 2-3 months of savings at my current income, and isn't something I can currently save up for as I have other more pressing issues that have to come first.

Next time, please leave the hostility at the door. It does not serve anyone well.
 
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Uwe

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Used ones look to be available on eBay for $200-$300. Might be worth trying?

-Uwe-
 
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Jack@European_Parts

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Uwe & OP

Taking apart and a crack at soldering nice flex wires would cost time/no money and most likely fix it no?

Couldn't you just fill with silicone after verified operated?
 
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Uwe

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Uwe & OP

Taking apart and a crack at soldering nice flex wires would cost time/no money and most likely fix it no?

Couldn't you just fill with silicone after verified operated?
Not sure. I've never had one of these apart.

-Uwe-
 
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Jack@European_Parts

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Well I have indeed opened ALMOST all units from 1998 to now and they all seem to have virtually the same type technology for the welding the connections encased in an anti-vibration jelly, WHY WOULD OEM's DO SOMETHING SO STUPID?

This would be MAF's & CVT's too NO?

So why is it that all these parts are permitted to be made like this or with the technology & such a widespread defect without often an ADR at NHTSA/EPA?

Personally I refrain from repairs on these units too & because I don't want part of that liability chain, would you?
 
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davisev5225

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Planned obsolescence? So that somewhere after 8-10 years of age, it's no longer economically feasible to repair the car?

Just a guess.

-Uwe-
It's no longer "economically feasible" because of your previous sentence - planned obsolescence. There's no other reason for it. These things are DESIGNED to break.

And the timeline matches up with GM's original idea that "you should replace your car every 5-10 years". :rolleyes:



As for buying one on eBay, I've considered it more than once. My main concern is that I would be buying a unit with the exact same issues, and then I have to go through the hassle of trying to get my money back. I might take that route anyway, though, and send my original unit out for repair. There's a company in Oregon(?) that does it for $300, with a warranty.

EDIT: And Jack, the connection they use is a sonic weld. It's ROHS compliant, but not as reliable a mechanical connection as solder. That's why they fill it with the anti-vibration gel - to keep the wiring from separating from its contact pads. It doesn't last, though, hence the issues...
 
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Uwe

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It's no longer "economically feasible" because of your previous sentence - planned obsolescence. There's no other reason for it. These things are DESIGNED to break.
I dunno. If I take off my tin-foil hat and slip the pocket protector into my Bosch engineer's lab-coat, I would say: "If you want us to build it to last 25 years and a half a million miles, we can, but it will cost substantially more."

You've got a 13-14 year old car that made it to 180,000 miles. Stuff is gonna break. Moreover, it was an expensive car when it was new. You may have bought it used for a song, (I don't know) but it will always cost like an expensive car to repair. This is why expensive cars depreciate more once they're out of warranty than cheaper, more common cars.

-Uwe-

PS: Has has the steering column lock played up yet? That's another thing those cars are infamous for.
 
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davisev5225

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You may have bought it used for a song, (I don't know) but it will always cost like an expensive car to repair. This is why expensive cars depreciate more once they're out of warranty than cheaper, more common cars.

-Uwe-

PS: Has has the steering column lock played up yet? That's another thing those cars are infamous for.
I got it for $5,710 out the door (tax, title, etc.). Salvaged title, had been in a front-end collision. I have replaced the headlights (because the dealer re-attached them with wood screws!), the front bumper skin, actual bumper and bumper shocks, several sensors, I've fixed oil leaks all over the engine, replaced the PCV manifold underneath the intake, various interior pieces that had broken, etc. I'm actually enjoying the challenge, and nothing has been a particular financial burden except for this ABS pump.

And yes, my steering column lock has died. First, it died locked, which is rather inconvenient as I was in a grocery store parking lot. I managed to unjam it by spamming the ignition on and off rapidly, and it eventually failed open about a month later, and has stayed there for over 2 years now. I'm going to fix it when I retrofit the power adjust steering column (which I already acquired, along with the necessary extra bits of loom and the correct power delivery unit) into the car, but I'm in no particular rush.
 
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