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Thread: The space flight thread

  1. #11
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    Today's NASA photo of the day. I'm including a link, see you can see it in the native high-res.

    https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/f...61894-orig.jpg



    Did anyone notice the use of spherical rod ends on the hydraulic gimbal turning actuators?????

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  3. #12
    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
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    ^^^^ F1 engines missing the lower portions of their nozzles? ^^^^
    Ceterum censeo, delenda est Daesh.

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  5. #13
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uwe View Post
    ^^^^ F1 engines missing the lower portions of their nozzles? ^^^^
    Good eye!

    Here are three pictures from Wikipedia that show the missing nozzle extensions. Note the aluminum telescoping ladder on top of the center engine!!!!!






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  7. #14
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    Gene Cernan passed away a few days ago.....

    https://www.yahoo.com/tech/last-man-...014055113.html


  8. #15
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    The next space race is on!!!!!

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/report-ch...085506731.html

    Report: China developing advanced lunar mission spaceship

    Associated Press
    March 9, 2017



    FILE - In this June 16, 2012, file photo, the Shenzhou 9 spacecraft rocket launches from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Jiuquan, China. State media say China is developing an advanced new spaceship capable of both flying in low-Earth orbit and landing on the moon. The newspaper Science and Technology Daily cited spaceship engineer Zhang Bainian as saying the new craft would be recoverable and have room for multiple astronauts. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)


    BEIJING (AP) — China is developing an advanced new spaceship capable of both flying in low-Earth orbit and landing on the moon, according to state media, in another bold step for a space program that equaled the U.S. in number of rocket launches last year.

    The newspaper Science and Technology Daily cited spaceship engineer Zhang Bainian as saying the new craft would be recoverable and have room for multiple astronauts. While no other details were given in the Tuesday report, Zhang raised as a comparison the Orion spacecraft being developed by NASA and the European Space Agency. The agency hopes Orion will carry astronauts into space by 2023.

    China's Shenzhou space capsule used on all six of its crewed missions is based on Russia's Soyuz and is capable of carrying three astronauts in its re-entry module.

    China came late to crewed space flight, launching its first man into space in 2003, but has advanced rapidly since then. In its most recent crewed mission, two astronauts spent a month aboard a Chinese space station late last year.

    A fully functioning, permanently crewed space station is on course to begin operations in around five years and a manned lunar mission has been suggested for the future.

    Now firmly established among the big three in space travel, China last year moved ahead of Russia for the first time in number of rocket launches and equaled the United States at 22, according to Harvard University astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell. Russia had 17 launches, while the U.S. might have had several more if Space X's Falcon 9 rocket fleet hadn't been grounded following a Sept. 1 launchpad explosion.

  9. #16
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    https://www.yahoo.com/news/china-lau...031116332.html

    China to launch lunar space probe before year's end

    Reuters
    March 8, 2017

    BEIJING (Reuters) - China announced plans on Tuesday to launch a space probe to bring back samples from the moon before the end of the year, in what state media cast as competition to U.S. President Donald Trump's ambitions to revitalise U.S. space exploration.

    The Chang'e-5 lunar probe is undergoing a final round of tests and is expected to be on standby for launch from August, the official People's Daily said, citing the China National Space Administration.

    The launch will involve new challenges for China in sample collection, taking off from the moon and high-speed reentry to the Earth's atmosphere, making it "one of China's most complicated and difficult space missions", Hu Hao, an official from China's Lunar Exploration Programme, told the paper.

    Chinese President Xi Jinping has called for China to become a global power in space exploration.

    "Not long ago, the United States' Trump Administration revealed an ambition to return to the moon. Our country also announced a series of deep space exploration plans," said the official Science and Technology Daily.

    "The moon is the first stop for humanity's march towards deep space," the paper said.

    In February, the Trump administration asked the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to look into the possibility of manning a heavy-lift rocket mission, expected to be launched in 2018, perhaps setting the stage for a human return to the moon.

    China's new probe is the latest step in its lunar exploration programme. In 2013, it completed its first lunar "soft landing" since 1976 with the Chang'e-3 craft and its Jade Rabbit rover.

    China is aiming to send a probe to the dark side of the moon by 2018, the first ever such trip, and hopes to put astronauts on the moon by 2036.

    (Reporting by Christian Shepherd; Editing by Paul Tait)

  10. #17
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    Why does the second picture in the article below make me think that some millennial slacker pulled the Skylab blueprints out of mothballs and plans to re-use them?????



    http://www.businessinsider.com/nasa-...ans-sls-2017-4

    The first Mars astronauts may be trapped inside of a tube for 3 years with no chance of escape

    Dave Mosher

    * NASA has finally revealed details about its plan to send astronauts to Mars.

    * The plan calls for building an outpost to orbit the moon and test Mars hardware.

    * A crew of four may have to spend up to three years inside of a Mars spaceship — yet never land on the planet.

    * It remains to be seen if NASA's flat budget can facilitate reaching Mars by 2033.


    For years, NASA has talked about sending people to Mars with its gigantic new rocket, the Space Launch System, and a new spacecraft called Orion.

    But NASA hasn't said exactly how it plans to use this hardware, which it's spending $40 billion to develop — not even with the publication of a 36-page Mars exploration plan in October 2015.

    Fortunately, a plan may finally be coming into place.

    On March 21, President Donald Trump signed a law that mandates NASA send people to Mars by 2033. Then, a week later, the space agency published its most detailed plan yet for reaching the red planet.

    The scheme is neither for the claustrophobic nor the faint of heart. It involves locking astronauts into a tube-shaped spaceship, sending them into deep space for three years, and giving them no form of emergency escape beyond the moon.

    What's more, astronauts would only orbit Mars in 2033 — they'd never attempt a landing.

    That's according to a document by William Gerstenmaier, the head of NASA's human exploration and operations directorate, that he presented during a NASA advisory council meeting on March 28. We learned about the presentation via a story by Eric Berger at Ars Technica.

    "NASA is leading the next steps into deep space near the moon, where astronauts will build and begin testing the systems needed for challenging missions to deep space destinations including Mars," NASA said about the plan in a press release.

    Getting to Mars in five phases


    An artist's concept of NASA's Deep Space Gateway space station, left, near the moon. NASA

    Gerstenmaier's program lists five phases to reach Mars.

    Phase 0 involves using the International Space Station "as a test bed to demonstrate key exploration capabilities and operations, and foster an emerging commercial space industry" with partners like SpaceX, Boeing, Orbital ATK, and others. We're currently in this phase.

    Phase 1 is ambitious, involving six launches between 2018 and 2025.

    First, NASA wants to launch its inaugural SLS rocket, a 321-foot behemoth that's designed to rival the Saturn V rockets that blasted Apollo astronauts to the moon. If the maiden flight and tests of its Orion spaceship went well, the space agency would launch five more SLS rockets.

    The first of those five would send NASA's unrelated Europa Clipper probe to Jupiter, where it would study an icy moon with a hidden ocean that may be habitable to alien life. Four other missions would each launch a piece of a new space station, called the Deep Space Gateway, into orbit near the moon — a region called cislunar space — where four astronauts would help assemble and provision it.

    "The gateway could move to support robotic or partner missions to the surface of the moon, or to a high lunar orbit to support missions departing from the gateway to other destinations in the solar system," Gerstenmaier said in the release.


    An artist's concept of NASA's Deep Space Transport spaceship, right, near the moon. NASA

    Phase 2 would build on the lunar space station by launching a Deep Space Transport to it in 2027. Then, around 2028 or 2029, four lucky astronauts would spend up to 400 days inside the 41-ton tube as it orbits near the moon. Their mission: make sure the DST works and nothing critical stops working.

    Phase 3 would begin around 2030, assuming the DST and its crew experienced no problems. Another SLS flight would restock the spaceship with supplies and fuel, then yet another launch would load it with four people — the first crew to visit Mars.

    Their two- to three-year flight "would likely involve a Venus flyby and a short stay around Mars" and "would offer no hope for an emergency return once the crew leaves cislunar space," Berger wrote.

    Phase 4 would happen beyond 2033 and is fairly nebulous at this point. All it calls for in Gerstenmaier's document is "development and robotic preparatory missions" to deliver habitats and supplies to the surface of Mars, plus eventual "Mars human landing missions."

    Will NASA put the first boots on Mars?

    It remains to be seen whether NASA can pull off this grand plan on the relatively flat budget Congress keeps handing it.

    During the Apollo moon missions, NASA made up more than 4% of the US budget. Today, its share has shrunk to about half a percent.

    Even if NASA manages to execute this plan, it may have competition from the private partners it hopes to involve. The private sector may even beat NASA to Mars.

    Elon Musk, the founder of the rocket company SpaceX, recently said he planned to send people to Mars by 2022. Boeing has also challenged SpaceX in getting to the red planet. Musk said he was OK with this because all he wanted to do was colonize Mars and protect humanity from self-imposed annihilation or a rogue asteroid.

    "I think it's good for there to be multiple paths to Mars ... to have multiple irons in the fire," Musk said in August.

  11. #18
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2017...-peggy-whitson

    POTUS to Call Space to Congratulate Record Breaking Astronaut Peggy Whitson

    APRIL 21, 2017 AT 11:41 AM ET
    BY THE WHITE HOUSE

    On Monday, April 24, 2017, President Donald J. Trump will call the commander of the International Space Station, astronaut Peggy Whitson, to congratulate her on breaking the American record for the most total days in space. The current record holder, Jeff Williams stayed in space for 534 days. Whitson will break that record for most cumulative days in space Monday at 1:27 a.m. EDT. In 2002, Whitson flew to space for the first time on the Expedition 5 mission and in 2007 she became the first female astronaut to take command of the International Space Station. Whitson also holds the record for most spacewalks conducted by a female astronaut.

    Details for the President’s call with astronaut Peggy Whitson:

    When: Monday, April 24, 2017

    Time: 10:00 AM EDT

    Where: The President will call the International Space Station from the Oval Office

    Who: Ivanka Trump and astronaut Kate Rubins will join the President’s call with Commander Whitson and astronaut Jack Fischer will be joining Whitson at the International Space Station.

    How to tune in: The 20 minute call will air live on NASA Television and will be livestreamed on NASA’s website and Facebook page.

    Get more information on this historic event here.

  12. #19
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    https://news.uci.edu/press-releases/...et-into-space/

    With $1 million gift, UCI aims to become first university to launch rocket into space
    Donation expands partnership with Base 11 to address STEM talent crisis

    ON APRIL 24, 2017

    Irvine, Calif., April 24, 2017 — University of California, Irvine students will “shoot for the moon” thanks to a $1 million gift from Base 11, a nonprofit STEM workforce development and entrepreneur accelerator. The “Moonshot Initiative” will establish a rocketry program at The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, with the intent of making UCI the first academic institution to launch a liquid-fuel rocket into space.

    The Base 11 donation will turn an existing area on the Engineering Tower’s ground floor into a rocketry lab that enables students to design, build and test rocket prototypes between 15 and 50 feet long. It will also fund a mobile operations center and assembly trailer that can transport rockets to test sites and will allow students to make repairs off-site as needed.

    “We’ve found that by exposing our students early to hands-on experiential learning, we have better success in keeping them engaged and inspired in their education,” said Gregory Washington, Stacey Nicholas Dean of Engineering at the Samueli School. “This partnership with Base 11 will help us create an exciting and innovative opportunity for our students.”

    The first liquid-fuel rocket will be built from a prefab prototype that UCI students will modify to travel 25,000 feet high and then further refine to reach 50,000 feet. The ultimate goal is to construct a rocket within two years that breaches outer space, surpassing the Karman line at about 328,000 feet. The rocketry lab will be complete by summer’s end.

    The Moonshot Initiative is the latest effort in a growing partnership between the Samueli School and Base 11. In 2016, the nonprofit funded the UCI Base 11 Autonomous Systems Engineering Academy, which introduces community college students to a variety of engineering concepts by having them design and build an unmanned aircraft system, or drone, and then program it to fly. Last summer, five community college students from across the country spent two months at UCI as Base 11 fellows. (See video here.)

    The nonprofit has also funded an academic-year internship program that brings high-potential, low-resource community college students from around Southern California to UCI on Saturdays for valuable exposure to university-level engineering concepts. And the Samueli School leads a pilot of Base 11’s STEM Entrepreneur Program, which combines traditional entrepreneurial education with work at the school’s Institute for Design & Manufacturing Innovation.

    “Base 11’s partnership with UCI is focused on executing a workforce development strategy that provides the engineering and computer science talent so desperately needed by aerospace, high-tech and transportation industry companies,” said Landon Taylor, CEO of Base 11. “UCI and Dean Washington are ideal partners who share our vision of solving the STEM talent pipeline crisis by transforming underrepresented women and minorities into STEM leaders of the 21st century.”

    About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UCI is the youngest member of the prestigious Association of American Universities. The campus has produced three Nobel laureates and is known for its academic achievement, premier research, innovation and anteater mascot. Led by Chancellor Howard Gillman, UCI has more than 30,000 students and offers 192 degree programs. It’s located in one of the world’s safest and most economically vibrant communities and is Orange County’s second-largest employer, contributing $5 billion annually to the local economy. For more on UCI, visit www.uci.edu.

    About Base 11: Base 11 is a nonprofit workforce development accelerator focused on solving the STEM talent pipeline crisis being fueled by the underrepresentation of women and minorities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. By establishing Innovation Centers integrated with hands-on, project-based learning and STEM entrepreneurship training, Base 11 and its industry, academic and philanthropic partners set students on direct pathways to four-year STEM degrees, well-paid STEM jobs and the opportunity to launch their own STEM-related businesses. For more information, visit www.Base11.com. Base 11 is a DBA of the Center for Innovation in Education, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) – IRS exemption EIN#26-4365936.

    Media access: Radio programs/stations may, for a fee, use an on-campus ISDN line to interview UCI faculty and experts, subject to availability and university approval. For more UCI news, visit news.uci.edu. Additional resources for journalists may be found at communications.uci.edu/for-journalists.

  13. #20
    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
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    Base 11 is a nonprofit workforce development accelerator focused on solving the STEM talent pipeline crisis being fueled by the underrepresentation of women and minorities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
    Yeah, OK then.
    Ceterum censeo, delenda est Daesh.

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