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Thread: The Airplane thread

  1. #11
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    Why the military no longer has a base in NYC?????



    http://www.businessinsider.com/the-m...oneyard-2016-6

  2. #12
    NostraJackAss Jack@European_Parts's Avatar
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    B2 was neat in 1998......
    It flew over silent and the shadow scared me while going outside to get a car.

    Went by so slow and quiet........in comparison to a flash when others go by.




    My favorite to this day is the Corsair.

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  3. #13
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    http://www.wearethemighty.com/articl...ng-an-exercise

    That time a Navy F-14 accidentally-on-purpose shot down an Air Force F-4 during an exercise
    by Logan Nye - Jun 23, 2016 8:32:18 am


    There are a couple things that everyone going into a military exercise absolutely has to get right. First, get good training and look for ways to improve both personal and unit performance. Second, and perhaps more importantly, don’t really shoot anyone.

    Guess which thing Navy Lt. (j.g.) Timothy Dorsey, an F-14 pilot, messed up while shadowing an Air Force RF-4C Phantom over the Mediterranean on Sep. 22, 1987?

    Dorsey and his radar intercept officer, Lt. Cmdr. Edmund Holland, were taking part in an exercise testing the defenses of the Navy carrier USS Saratoga against enemy attacks. The Air Force had provided a jet and aircrew, Capt. Michael Ross and 1st Lt. Randy Sprouse, to act as the opposing force.

    Ross took off from Aviano Air Base, Italy, and began searching for the carrier. The unarmed jet would need to get within visual distance of the Saratoga and read off its hull number to count a “kill” against it in the exercise.

    The exercise orders called for Dorsey and another F-14 to be unarmed as well, but both Navy jets were actually carrying live missiles. The Navy pilots would have to simulate an attack on the opposing force jet to win.

    The Air Force crew faced trouble early on when its equipment for hunting the Navy carrier and its fleet electronically malfunctioned. Ross and Sprouse began conducting a visual search instead. The Navy jets got lucky early when the combat controllers sent them after a radio contact that turned out to be the RF-4C refueling from an Illinois Air National Guard KC-135 tanker.

    Dorsey’s flight joined up on the tanker and picked up fuel. Ross and Sprouse flew away first and returned to searching for the carrier. Dorsey and Holland, obviously believing that they had spotted their quarry, pursued the Phantom.

    The Air Force jet found the carrier, but also knew that a Navy jet was on its tail. Sprouse, the backseater on the Phantom, alerted Ross to the Navy presence.

    “There`s a Navy F-14 sitting on our left wing at about 8 o’clock,” Sprouse said.

    “Okay, he’s a good guy,” Ross said.

    Meanwhile, Dorsey was tracking the Air Force jet’s progress toward the carrier. When the RF-4C got to about 15 miles from the Saratoga, Ross initiated a diving turn at the carrier, simulating the start of an attack run. Dorsey called out the threat to Holland and they alerted the Saratoga.

    So far, everything is good. The Air Force is simulating an attack on the carrier, the Navy is simulating the protocol for attacking a threat to the carrier.

    The Saratoga responded, “Red and free on your contact.” And that was where everything got messy. Dorsey, relatively new to the Saratoga and with only a couple hundred hours of flight time under his belt, was under the impression that “red and free” was a command to fire that was only used in real-world, “Shoot that guy right now!” situations.

    Still, he hesitated and asked for guidance.

    “Jesus, do they want me to shoot this guy?” he asked.

    The phrase, “red and free,” was commonly used around the Saratoga in exercises. Holland, thinking that Dorsey still understood that everything was taking place within the limits of the exercise, not an actual fight, responded with, “Yes. Shoot!”

    Dorsey armed one sidewinder and attempted to fire, but the missile failed. So, he fired another and this one slammed into the back of the recently-fueled Air Force jet.

    Holland later said of that moment, “I heard a ‘whish’ sound from the right side of the aircraft, and I looked out and I said, ‘What was that?’ I saw the front end of an F-4 and the back end was in flames. I said, ‘You shot him down!’ and I was absolutely amazed.”

    It was Holland’s shock and sudden questions that alerted Dorsey to the fact that he had done something very wrong.

    Ross and Sprouse, meanwhile, we’re going through their own sudden crisis. They mistakenly believed that they had collided with the F-14 that was tailing them. The RF-4C was shaking violently and parts of it were on fire.

    Ross gave the order to eject.

    “I’m gone,” Sprouse said as he pulled the ejection handle. Both airmen got clear of the dying jet and Holland radioed for an at-sea rescue.

    “Mayday! Mayday! Got a kill on a Fox 4!”

    For obvious reasons, Navy commanders immediately started asking what had happened. Ross and Sprouse were fished out of the water and questioned by Navy lawyers. They both gave full statements before the commander of the Saratoga, Navy Capt. David Frost, told them what really happened and apologized. (Probably something like, “oh, by the way, we shot you down. Sorry. Okay, who’s up for some great Navy chow?”)

    Sprouse and Ross received medical attention, Navy uniforms, and a swag bag. They were given the best dinner on the ship and good spots to sleep until they could be sent back to the Air Force.

    Dorsey was grounded but allowed to stay in the Navy. He made it to the rank of captain in the reserves as an intelligence officer and then an inspector general. In 2012, he was recommended for promotion to admiral. When Congress heard about his 1987 incident, they declined to vote on his promotion, effectively rejecting it.

    Many suspect that Dorsey wouldn’t have been allowed to stay in the Navy if it weren’t for the fact that his father was James Dorsey, a prominent figure in the Naval aviation community. In 1987, Dorsey was the captain of the USS America, a supercarrier.

    Ross’s injuries from the shootdown appeared slight when he was rescued from the ocean, but grew steadily worse as he aged. He received 32 surgeries and became fully disabled.

  4. #14
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    So, this Airbus A320 goes to Seattle (home of huge Boeing factory) and spontaneously bursts into flames. Suspicious, or late night TV comedy punch line?????

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/fire-ame...efore-takeoff/

    Fire erupts on flight in Seattle just before takeoff
    CBS/AP June 29, 2016, 1:28 PM

    SEATTLE - A fire erupted on an American Airlines plane as it headed for the runway to depart Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, but the blaze was quickly extinguished.

    No injuries were reported Wednesday morning.

    Airport spokesman Brian DeRoy says the Airbus A320 was on the taxiway going toward the runway when smoke started coming out of the back of the plane. He says a spark in the auxiliary power unit just below the tail section started a small fire.

    We were in the last row, the fire was right behind us. We didn't know about it of course. Doesn't that wing look like it crumpled the side of the plane? Weird.
    A photo posted by Mike Fleming (@mikefleming3) on Jun 29, 2016 at 9:29am PDT

    The Port of Seattle Fire Department responded and put the fire out. The aircraft headed back to the gate.

    Flight 728 had been scheduled to depart for Philadelphia at 8:10 a.m. It had 151 passengers and 6 crew members on board. CBS affiliate KIRO-TV reports it was rescheduled to depart at 11 a.m. local time.

  5. #15
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    A few pics from a local airshow today. Not a big event. My first time seeing a Grumman F-8F up close and then doing low passes.











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  10. #18
    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
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    Just what I always wanted to do: Hover in an aircraft with a single engine and NO auto-rotation capabilities at all.

    Hopefully, it has a really good ejection seat.
    Ceterum censeo, delenda est Daesh.

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  12. #19
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    I got to work on the JSF back in the late 90s (gives you an idea of how long these things take to develop). The company I worked for did the tooling for the first 7 planes, and my job was to design molds to make the intake ducts. They were about 18' long and the first thing I noticed was how they bent around where the vertical duct is in that plane.

    When they told me they were running a drive shaft forward from the only engine on the plane to a 90 degree gearbox for the vertical lift duct I about split a gut.

    You can trash the JSF, sorry F-35, all you want but the Lockheed version was 1000X better plane than the offering by my current employer. Nicknamed "Monica"* by non-fans everywhere, the Lockheed engineers knew way in advance that the Boeing plane would never take off vertically without a ski jump run (which turned out to be true).

    While I have a sense of pride that I got to work on perhaps the most sophisticated plane of our time, I'm no fan of one size fits all military planes. The F-111 should have been the only lesson we needed.

    *Think back as to who was the President at the time:

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  14. #20
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uwe View Post
    Hopefully, it has a really good ejection seat.
    Hopefully, they used a zero-zero ejection seat...and didn't borrow the design from the F-104's original downward-firing seats.

    I had a friend who used to tell the story about how NATO pilots were trained to roll the F-104 over before ejecting at low altitudes...not realizing that later versions had an upward-firing seat that, um, didn't work as well at low altitudes.....

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