Page 1 of 24 12311 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 231

Thread: The Airplane thread

  1. #1
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,090
    Post Thanks / Like

    The Airplane thread

    Since there always seems to be interesting airplane articles popping up in the news, why not give them their own thread?

    https://hushkit.net/2016/05/25/the-t...viet-aircraft/

    The 11 worst Soviet aircraft of all time, in particular:

    7. Silvanskii IS

    Silvanskii is a name synonymous with Russian fighters..oh, wait – no it’s not. And there is a very good reason that it’s not. In the midst of Stalin’s muddled and oppressive USSR, one A.V. Silvanskii secured state funding to create a new fighter in 1937. The concept seemed sound- it was a low-winged monoplane with a 1,000 horsepower radial engine, armed with two heavy machine guns. As development began it soon became apparent that Silvanskii was a reckless bodger. By 1938 the prototype aircraft was virtually complete. Initial tests of the undercarriage revealed that the wheel wells were too small- the undercarriage did not fit into the wing in the retracted position. How this elementary mistake had been made is hard to understand, but the solution was simple- the undercarriage legs were shortened. Now the undercarriage could be retracted it was realised that the wheel bays were too shallow so the undercarriage would stick out into the airstream producing drag. Deciding not to rectify this issue, the team then fitted the propeller. Though the aircraft now had a shorter undercarriage than originally designed, no-one saw fit to think through the consequences of this modification; the propeller was now too large and would smash against the ground on take-off. Ever the master of methodical engineering, Silvanskii took a saw to the offending propeller and lopped four inches off each blade. The manager of the GAZ state aircraft factory watched this slapstick affair with dismay and growing alarm. He quite sensibly refused Silvanskii permission to fly from the factory airfield. The persistent Silvanskii looked for an alternative airfield for his fighter and charmed the State Flight Research Institute (LII) in Moscow into providing a runway and a test pilot for the maiden flight. One cold morning in early 1939, the LII test pilot strapped himself into the aircraft, known simply as the IS or ‘Istrebitel’ (fighter) and prepared to fly. The machine had other ideas, but thanks to a combination of full throttle and extremely dense cold air the machine was coaxed into taking off for one hair-raising circuit flown dangerously close to the stall. On landing the pilot damned the aircraft as unflyable. The Silvanskii bureau was bankrupted and the hapless designer was banned from working in aeronautical design.

    — Joe Coles, Hush-Kit

  2. Likes Jack@European_Parts, jyoung8607 liked this post
  3. #2
    Verified VCDS User
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    497
    Post Thanks / Like
    Which is why Howard Hughes proclaimed the Spruce Goose a success and paid to keep it "airworthy" for the remainder of his life.

    Meanwhile, the US went all the way to 1941 with this gem offered up by my employer:


  4. Likes Boki Ar, Jack@European_Parts, Uwe, vreihen liked this post
  5. #3
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,090
    Post Thanks / Like
    I assume that everyone heard about the P-47 Thunderbolt that was shooting 75th anniversary promotional photos over Manhattan the other day? The pilot had a mechanical problem, and made an emergency landing at Captain Chesley B. "Sully" Sullenberger Field (aka: the Hudson River)...but without the same happy ending.....

  6. #4
    Administrator Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,849
    Post Thanks / Like
    Wow, the plane was amazingly intact. RIP the pilot though.


  7. #5
    Verified VCDS User
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Southwest Nebraska
    Posts
    8
    Post Thanks / Like
    The government mandated shoulder harness and airbags didn't save him? Hell of a way to go, may he RIP..........

  8. #6
    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    15,526
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by vreihen View Post
    I assume that everyone heard about the P-47 Thunderbolt that was shooting 75th anniversary promotional photos over Manhattan the other day? The pilot had a mechanical problem, and made an emergency landing at Captain Chesley B. "Sully" Sullenberger Field (aka: the Hudson River)...but without the same happy ending.....
    Nope. Hadn't heard. Thanks for posting. Can't click LIKE.

    RIP William Gordon
    Ceterum censeo, delenda est Daesh.

  9. #7
    Verified VCDS User
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    497
    Post Thanks / Like
    Previous chief pilot of the Old Rhinebeck museum.

    Apparently his foot was caught. The P-47 was wel known for durability, so the intact state isn't a shocker.

    RIP indeed.

  10. Likes Uwe liked this post
  11. #8
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,090
    Post Thanks / Like
    One of the designs for the T-38 replacement.....


  12. #9
    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    15,526
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1
    Wait, why does this ^ thing look like a de-fanged version of the Korean T50 "Golden Eagle", an airplane which has been flying since 2002?

    Edit: Oh wait, it is.
    Ceterum censeo, delenda est Daesh.

  13. Likes Jack@European_Parts, vreihen liked this post
  14. #10
    Verified VCDS User vreihen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    The Land of OCC, NY, USA, Earth
    Posts
    4,090
    Post Thanks / Like
    Speaking of US Military retreads.....

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/06/21...eet-delay.html

    Marine Corps forced to pull warbirds out of 'boneyard' after new fleet delay
    By Perry Chiaramonte Published June 21, 2016 FoxNews.com


    The Marines are looking for a few good planes, and their search has taken them to an Arizona boneyard where the Corps’ old F/A Hornets have been gathering dust and rust for years.

    The jets are being reclaimed and refurbished by Boeing after the service branch was caught short on planes because of long delays in the rollout of the much-awaited F-35.

    The Marines could have done as the Navy did and adopted second generation F/A- 18E/F Super Hornets until the new planes were ready, but opted not to.

    “In hindsight, it was a misstep for the USMC to not have purchased the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, but only because the F-35 has seen such extensive delays and complications in production,” Omar Lamrani, senior military analyst for global intelligence firm Stratfor told FoxNews.com. “If the F-35 had entered production as originally scheduled and at the expected price, then the USMC would have been able to successfully transition straight from the F/A-18 Hornets to the F-35.”

    A total of 30 F/A-18C Hornets recovered from the “boneyard” will be modified to a current “C+” standard under a contract with Boeing and the USMC signed in 2014. (USMC.mil)
    Boeing has refurbished two of a planned 30 F/A Hornets stored at the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base near Tucson – known as “the boneyard” – and will soon finish more, according to WarIsBoring.com. The planes will be modified to a current “C+” standard under a contract with Boeing and the USMC signed in 2014.

    It’s not the first time the military has brought back decommissioned planes from the graveyard. The Marines pulled and restored several retired heavy-lift helicopters during the height of the Iraq War to help with a shortfall in the fleet as a result of heavy usage and crashes.

    The F-35 was supposed to be ready for front-line service in 2006. The Marine Corps reasoned that the Super Hornets were too pricey to serve as a bridge to the new planes, and chose to continue to operate their current fleets.

    As the F/A Hornets dwindled through attrition, and quality-control issues delayed the F-35 from coming off the assembly, the Corps was caught short.

    Lt. Gen. Jon Davis, the USMC deputy commandant for aviation, told Senate lawmakers that just 32 percent of the Corps’ Hornet fighters were operational. The branch needs at least 58 percent of the F/A-18s to be flight ready so that there are enough planes for combat, flight instruction and day-to-day training.

    Officials for the USMC did not immediately return requests for comment but in their most recent annual report on aviation capabilities, Davis said, “I am concerned with our current readiness rates, both in equipment and personnel.”

    Some experts say bringing back the F/A-18 jets may not be much of an issue.

    “I consider it a pretty smart move on the U.S. Marine Corps side,” David Cenciotti, of the influential blog The Aviationist, told FoxNews.com. “The F/A-18C and D are very reliable airframes that are quite easy to maintain and operate. Once upgraded to the C+ standard, these ‘gap fillers’ are more than enough to conduct combat operations in low-lethality scenarios like those that see the USMC at work these days.”

    Once the upgraded ‘legacy’ Hornets are delivered, Cenciotti added, older planes can rotate to daily training activities required by the Marine Corps pilots to maintain preparedness.

    Lamrani says the only real danger is if maintenance is not kept up on the refurbished planes, but that their usage leads to other issues.

    “Refurbishing mothballed aircraft is not inexpensive, and hardly cost effective,” he told FoxNews.com. “All this is again linked to the F-35 failing to arrive on time.”


    Perry Chiaramonte is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter at @perrych

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •