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Thread: Installing BilStein ClubSport - 2016 Audi TTS with MRC

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    Installing BilStein ClubSport - 2016 Audi TTS with MRC

    My question: How or Can I turn off the MRC or do I need to buy the cheater modules that fool the car into thinking it still has MRC connected?

    I hope is the former; seems shame to have to buy a 300 gizmo to plug into the system to fool it.

    Thank you,

    Mossy

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    Benevolent Dictator Uwe's Avatar
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    I would think it could be coded out. Trouble is there may be other systems that get data from the suspension, for example the headlight range controller...

    Let's start with an Auto-Scan from the car so people can see exactly what it's made of.

    -Uwe-
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    I have posted one before, I haven't changed anything since then, do you still want me to post it again?

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    Last edited by mossback; 05-23-2017 at 02:37 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mossback View Post
    I have posted one before, I haven't changed anything since then, do you still want me to post it again?
    No, you don't need to post a new scan, but having a scan of this car (even the somewhat older one you posted above) provides context necessary for this thread.

    What I might do is disconnect the 14-Susp. Elect. module, untick 14 in the Gateway, and then see what other modules are unhappy as a result.

    However... As new as this car is, there are a number of things in it that aren't documented yet...

    -Uwe-
    Ceterum censeo, delenda est Daesh.

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    I reposted the link from the corrected scan.

    I will try the suggestion: 14-Susp.

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    The suggested area is greyed out, I can't get into the advanced coding area, and looked at every area I could with no suggestion MRC that I can changed. It needs a password for advanced coding.

    I tried to load a photo but the site is being finicky today...

    I just checked the ohm load on the front damper, it reads a rock steady 1.3ohm. The KW plug in module reads around that range but, acts like it has a capacitor in the potted module so the load jumps up and down. I need another person to compress the damper to see if that the 1.3 changes under compression. I might just be able to install 4 1.3ohm resistors...
    Last edited by mossback; 05-31-2017 at 01:43 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mossback View Post
    It the suggested area is greyed out, I cant get into the advanced coding area, and looked at every area I could with no suggestion of what I can be changed. It needs a password for advanced coding.
    https://adsell.smugmug.com/Car-stuff/i-2Jj3zZs/A
    Last edited by mossback; 05-31-2017 at 04:08 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mossback View Post
    I tested a shock with an DMM and as a static load its 1.3 ohms but when I moved the piston in and out the value changed slightly but quickly settled back to 1.3r. When I switched the DMM to Mv is where I was a bit surprised, the shock generates small amounts of AC current in the millivolt range but No DC. If I can't find a way into the system to turn off the Mag Shock option, the plug in modules that KW and iSweep sell (nearly 500.00$$), might be my only option. Only If building a resistor load with a small value capacitor would not harm the ECU, fear of shorting out the MRC brain.

    I wonder if the grayed out coding menu issue is due to the shocks being removed from the system, so I am locked out till I plug the shocks back in...

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    mossback: I'm not entirely certain that a DMM is the correct tool to measure the electrical damping characteristics of the shock. The problem with the DMM is its sampling rate in comparison to the likely wave shape from the shock (which I would suspect is mostly symmetrical with a fast decay time).

    If possible, I suggest that you use an oscilloscope - preferably one with a trace capture capability. I've no experience with this type of measurement, but the low impedance reading suggests that the signal is current based, rather than voltage based, so measuring into the shock with an open circuit probably isn't the best idea (if you have disconnected the wires from the module). Instead, it might be more prudent to use a shunt load of some type and then measure the volt-drop across the load (i think). If I remember my lab professor's teaching (long ago now), the maximum energy transfer happens when the measurement impedance equals the transducer impedance! So, if you measured the 1.3 ohms with the shock connected, it's likely that the latent internal impedance of the shock is 2 x 1.3 = 2.6 ohms (because the transducer would be wired in parallel with the low impedance of the module. So consider a 2.6 ohm shunt resistor as the starting point for your measurements (I think)

    If you can't get access to a storage oscilloscope, then you might try an analogue ammeter, but you will need to take account of the inertia of the coil/needle in the meter vis-a-vis the time constant of the electrical trace from the shock (I think). If you have not disconnected the shock from the car, then an analogue volt meter might be better than a DMM (but the mass-inertia of the needle and the frequency response of the meter is still a factor in the reading)'

    Don

    PS: "I was a bit surprised, the shock generates small amounts of AC current in the millivolt range but No DC." Is this so surprising? The typical waveform of the shock would likely be something like this:



    As you can see, the waveform is largely (but not totally) symmetrical - so when measured by a "true RMS" reading DMM. it would register an AC value, with little if any DC component - I think!
    Last edited by DV52; 06-06-2017 at 01:30 AM.
    VW Golf MkVII (103TSI) my13

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